A little more detail

Discussion-based

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Lectures are passive; discussions are active. Lectures demand listening; discussions demand listening, collaborating, engaging, formulating, and speaking. We think discussions are more fun and more rewarding. That’s why almost all our classes are moderated discussions. Step away from your desk and into the action!

Figure It Out

The average American absorbs 100,500 words and 34 gigabytes of information a day. Can anyone separate the truth from product-pitches and power-grabs? We hope so. We think so. We think the best way to do so is by learning what came before today. That’s why Gutenberg students start reading at the beginning (Epic of Gilgamesh, 2700 BCE) and keep going until we arrive at today.

Source Texts

You’d probably prefer to drink from the spring rather than the processing plant. We agree. You’d probably prefer to read straight from the source, not from secondary sources. We agree. You’d probably prefer to learn what influential people said, not what others say they said. We agree. We let the Bible, Machiavelli, Charles Darwin, Karl Marx, and Friedrich Nietzsche speak for themselves.

Books and authors students read at Gutenberg

Gilgamesh
Enuma Elish
Genesis
Exodus
Deuteronomy
Homer
Hesiod
Herodotus
Aristophanes
Aeschylus
Sophocles
Thucydides
Plato
Aristotle

Archimedes
Virgil
Cicero
Tacitus
Lucretius
Matthew
I Corinthians
Acts
Galatians
Plutarch
Augustine
Boethius
Thomas Aquinas
Dante

Machiavelli
Erasmus
Copernicus
Luther
Calvin
Shakespeare
Galileo
Kepler
Hobbes
Descartes
Locke
Newton
Defoe
Swift

Voltaire
Thomas Reid
Hume
Rousseau
Adam Smith
Kant
Goethe
Hegel
Austen
Federalist Papers
Constitution
Schopenhauer
Hawthorne
de Tocqueville

Feuerbach
John Stuart Mill
Darwin
Kierkegaard
Thoreau
Marx
George Eliot
Dostoevsky
Tolstoy
James
Nietzsche
Freud
Einstein
Joyce

Aldo Leopold
T. S. Eliot
Keynes
MacIntyre
Galbraith
Von Hayek
Ellul
C. S. Lewis
Solzhenitsyn
Kuhn
Francis Schaeffer
Flannery O’Connor
Kafka
Foucault

Skills, Not Data

Wise people don’t always have the most information. But wise people do the best job at assessing information. The way to wisdom is not through accumulating a massive database but by developing the skills of the wise. These skills are practiced every day in Gutenberg class discussions.

Be Vulnerable

Our culture is very combative. Dare mention politics or religion, and you might end up in a catfight. But fear not. You will not be penalized for opening up at Gutenberg. Our classes aren’t free of argument. Sometimes arguments can be helpful. But not the slash-and-burn kind. We pride ourselves in gentle classroom discourse.

Be Known

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The average student-to-teacher ration at a public university is 15-to-1. Ours is 3-to-1. Our professors will not just know your first name—they might even know your middle name.

What can I do with a liberal arts education?

Some think that a liberal arts degree isn’t practical. Nothing could be further from the truth.

A liberal arts degree is especially practical for today’s marketplace. Why? Today’s marketplace is moving at break-neck speed. New technologies reshape businesses every year.Today’s workers must constantly be improving to keep up with the change. (According to studies, today’s professional will change jobs eleven times during his or her career.)

Because the market is changing like quicksilver, today’s professionals must have 1) the ability to self-educate, 2) dynamic intelligence, and 3) the ability to communicate clearly. These skills are honed every day at Gutenberg College.

Here’s something big colleges don’t advertise. Majoring in a “practical” subject is not that practical. Many of the skills taught in their classes will be outdated by graduation-day. For example, skills taught in communications classes could be ancient history in two years. A liberal arts degree hones exactly the sort of skills that are needed for today’s market.

Gutenberg’s curriculum consists entirely of the “great books”—classic works of science, history, philosophy, theology, and literature. Our students start with the oldest of the great books, the Epic of Gilgamesh and the Bible. They keep reading and discussing until they reach contemporary classics like Relativity by Albert Einstein and Animal Farm by George Orwell.

Can I Get In?

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Gutenberg’s Admissions policy is simple. Our Admissions team asks two questions of every applicant:

  1. Does this student understand our unique curriculum?
  2. Can this student complete our curriculum?

If the answer to both questions is “yes,” we admit the student. Of course, to determine #2, we look at GPAs, SAT scores, the written answer to our essays, etc. But those numbers don’t always reveal how much a prospective student cares.

Some of our best students arrived at Gutenberg with mediocre or poor records in high school. Yet they thrived here. They thrived because they had never experienced an education this engaging. But once in our classroom, they began to blossom.

Want to get started? View our academic and financial aid applications.

Is It Affordable?

College has become too expensive. Too expensive! Many college students are graduating with thousands in debt before they even have a decent job! Gutenberg refuses to saddle our graduates with a pile of debt.

Most private colleges cost around $40,000 a year. Not Gutenberg. We charge only $12,000 a year. Don’t worry. Even if $12,000 seems high, Gutenberg offers very generous financial aid packages. If you have questions about financial aid, e-mail Tim, our Admissions director.

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SO WHAT DO YA' THINK?

If you’d like to keep reading a bit more about what Gutenberg is like or just dive right in to the technical
stuff, head over here. Otherwise, we’d love to get to know you better, so…

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